The Burmese Harp

The Burmese Harp

Synopsis

A rhapsodic celebration of song, a brutal condemnation of wartime mentality, and a lyrical statement of hope within darkness; even amongst the riches of 1950s’ Japanese cinema, The Burmese Harp, stands as one of the finest achievements of its era.
  
At the close of World War II, a Japanese army regiment in Burma surrenders to the British. Private Mizushima is sent on a lone mission to persuade a trapped Japanese battalion to surrender also. When the outcome is a failure, he disguises himself in the robes of a Buddhist monk in hope of temporary anonymity as he journeys across the landscape – but he underestimates the power of his assumed role. A visually extraordinary and deeply moving vision of horror, necessity, and redemption in the aftermath of war, Ichikawa’s breakthrough film is one of the great humanitarian affirmations of the cinema.

Technical Specs

Director: Kon Ichikawa
Year: 1956
Country: Japan
Language: Japanese | Burmese
Duration: 116 min
Colour: B/W
Alternate Title: Biruma No Tategoto